The 1 billion San Francisco building dollars are slowly sinking underground


When San Francisco developers built the luxurious 58-story Millennium Tower, they hoped the rich and famous would come.

The tallest residential tower in San Francisco, launched in 2009, was a hit where sports stars and technicians from Silicon Valley threw millions down to get their glamorous homes up.

The Millennium Tower continues to sink, tilting about 7.5 inches each year, engineers have said.
The Millennium Tower continues to sink, tilting about 7.5 inches each year, engineers have said. (AP)

The tower’s 400 apartments were quickly sold out, increasing sales by just over $ 1 billion.

But it was literally the pinnacle of prestige building, which has been slowly sinking into the San Francisco soil ever since.

In court papers filed by some unhappy residents, they claim that their multi-million dollar apartments are now worth nothing, or at best a few dollars.

Since the problem first emerged, developers have been trying to figure out how to keep the building upright and upright.

Apart from apartment values, the residents are anxious.

San Francisco is located on one of the world’s most infamous fault lines, the 1,200-mile-long San Andreas Fault.

In 1989, a magnitude 6.9 earthquake shook the San Francisco Bay Area, killing 67 people and causing more than $ 5 billion in damage.

An undated image provided by the San Francisco Department of Building Inspection shows a window cracked in the Millennium Tower.
An undated image provided by the San Francisco Department of Building Inspection shows a window cracked in the Millennium Tower. (AP)
In this 1989 archive photo, a California Highway Patrol officer checks the damage to cars that fell when the upper deck of the Bay Bridge collapsed on the lower deck after the Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco.
In this 1989 archive photo, a California Highway Patrol officer checks the damage to cars that fell when the upper deck of the Bay Bridge collapsed on the lower deck after the Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco. (AAP)

According to a civil engineer who is now tasked with fighting Mother Nature and solving the gigantic problem, the Millennium Tower is sinking steadily and leaning to the side by about 7.5 inches each year.

If the problem is not resolved quickly, engineer Ron Hamburger believes the building can tilt to such an angle that elevators will not run and the building’s extensive plumbing may stop working.

Last week, Mr Hamburger told the city supervisor that the building remained safe and that 18 steel piles hammered into the bedrock under the tower would stop it from tilting further.

Earth engineers install data collection devices and obtain soil samples outside the Millennium Tower in San Francisco
Earth engineers install data collection devices and obtain soil samples outside the Millennium Tower in San Francisco. (AP)

Engineers have calculated that for every 2.5 centimeters, the tower sinks into the ground, tilting it almost 13 cm to the side at the top.

NBC reported last year the tower now tilted 66 cm at the top.

The current project to repair the tower is estimated to cost $ 138 million.

Last year, the fix-it project and efforts to drill into the bedrock were halted after engineers noticed the tower had sunk 2.5 cm in a matter of weeks, just after work began.

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