Roseanne Barr’s daughter reveals she has PTSD after being ‘locked inside’ facilities for troubled teenagers


Roseanne Barr’s daughter reveals she has PTSD after being ‘locked inside’ facilities for troubled teenagers

Rolling out Jenny Pentland

Courtesy

Roseanne Barr’s daughter Jenny Pentland opens up for the first time about the five traumatic years she spent in and out of various facilities for troubled teens in the 80s and 90s.

“I was locked up,” Pentland said in the latest issue of PEOPLE. Between the ages of 13 and 18, she was sent to a number of reform schools, psychiatric institutions and a wilderness bootcamp in response to “acting out”, which she attributes in part to the pressure from her mother’s sudden Roseanne fame.

In her new memories, This is going to be fun later which is released on January 18, Pentland, 45, and details are placed by her mother and father, Bill Pentland, in various facilities on the recommendation of education and behavioral experts.

“I got bad grades and I was muzzled, cut my arms and smoked cigarettes,” she says. “Just depressed.” (According to Pentland, her older sister Jessica had already been sent to a Los Angeles psychiatric hospital after stealing Barr’s car for a joyride).

“I think there was a fear that we were going to get out of control,” Pentland said.

Rolling out Jenny Pentland

Rolling out Jenny Pentland

Courtesy

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Rolling out Jenny Pentland

Rolling out Jenny Pentland

Pentland, who struggled with PTSD years later, says she witnessed or experienced emotional or physical abuse at several of the places she was sent to (all now closed or under new ownership). But she says that “the worst abuse I feel I have suffered was to have my free will removed – the lack of freedom.”

Now happily married to husband Jeff and mother of five sons, Eitan, 21, Cosmo, 16, Otis, 14, Buster, 12, and Ezra, 18 months, Pentland – who says she has a good relationship with both her parents – expresses itself in the hope of raising awareness of problematic programs aimed at troubled teenagers.

“These places are still out there and I want it to stop,” she says. “I no longer think about what I have lost. I think about what other people are losing right now, or what they are going to lose if that does not change.”

For more on Pentland’s history, download the latest issue of PEOPLE at newsstands Friday.

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